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1 edition of Determination of fungal propagales in indoor air found in the catalog.

Determination of fungal propagales in indoor air

Determination of fungal propagales in indoor air

project report

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Published by CMHC in [Ottawa] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fungi -- Spores -- Measurement.,
  • Indoor air pollution -- Measurement.,
  • Air -- Analysis.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared for Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation by Paracel Laboratories Ltd.
    SeriesResearch report, Research report (Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation)
    ContributionsParacel Laboratories Ltd., Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination11 p.
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21162522M

    Miller, J. D., (), "Fungi as contaminants in indoor air", Atmospheric Environment, v 26A, n 12, p Abstract: This article reviews the subject of contamination of indoor air with fungal spores. Qualitative Assay of the Fungal Aero Allergens (Molds) after using an Air Fantasticair purifier While the fungal exposure assessment was based on the determination of fungal propagules for a long time, recent progress has led to the development of methodology for other fungal agents, e.g. the fungal cell wall components, metabolites, and allergens that may be responsible for health effects caused by fungal .

    always reflect what are outdoors because of air dilution due to large air spaces in these buildings. In an airtight and mechanically ventilated building, indoor fungal types and species may be a collection of outdoor fungi over several days. 4. Compare the data set of complaint-area samples to determine what are the fungi consistently detected. Abstract: While the fungal exposure assessment was based on the determination of fungal propagules for a long time, recent progress has led to the development of methodology for other fungal agents, e.g. the fungal cell wall components, metabolites, and allergens, that may be responsible for health effects caused by fungal exposure.

    Viable air testing requires speciation of all viable fungi At ambient temperatures less than or equal to 0°C, control and indoor samples may be collected using only membrane or grease filters (e.g. Burkard or Air-O-Cell filters) and results analyzed for Total Fungal Particulates. Table 1 Total Fungal Particulate. Fungal Sampling Methods Sean P. Abbott, Ph.D. Natural Link MOLD LAB, Inc. General Considerations Currently, the method of choice for assessing potential exposures to airborne molds and mycotoxins in indoor environments involves the collection and identification of fungal propagules. Determining types and prevalence of various species of fungi.


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Determination of fungal propagales in indoor air Download PDF EPUB FB2

Conclusions: The presence of fungal propagules in indoor air cannot be reliably predicted by home characteristics. Actual measurements are required for fungal exposure assessment, and the use of only one medium to collect samples in one location in a home might be adequate to represent residential levels of fungi in indoor by: culturable airborne fungal propagules.

Material and methods Sample collection and analysis Indoor air samples were collected from infant bedrooms and main living areas in homes in the Northeast USA, from December to January A Burkard portable air sampler (Burkard Manufacturing Co., Rickmansworth, UK) in combination with DG.

Similarly, numbers of airborne fungal propagules out of doors decreased 60% between the dry and wet season. In general, the total fungal concentrations in indoor air were less than 10 3 cfu m −3 and a large proportion of them was collected in Stage-2 of the Andersen sampler.

Moreover, the ratio between indoor and outdoor concentrations was Cited by: When a fungal colony develops on a moldy surface, fungal propagules may be released from the surface into the indoor air (Gopalakrishnan et al., ). Fungal spores can easily be detached from the colonies by disturbance and then dispersed into the air (Frankel et al., ; Piekarska et al., ).Author: Xian Li, Shugang Wang, Tengfei Zhang, Jihong Wang.

The experiments were conducted at four air velocities typical for the following environments: indoor air ( m s 1), outdoor air ( and m s 1), and ventilation ducts ( m s 1). These four velocities were adjusted through four combinations of two different orifice sizes for the air inlet and two different flow rates through the inlet.

Indoor air mycobiota were estimated to +/- CFU m(-3), and the conidia of fungus Aspergillus niger were the dominant fungal propagules in the air. The present study was aimed at evaluating the number of bacteria and mould fungi in the indoor and outdoor environment of Toruń University Library.

The sampling sites were located in the rooms serving the functions typical of libraries (i.e. in the Main Reading Room, Current Periodicals Reading. showed that viable micro-organisms accounted for up to % of the total number of microbial propagules.

Hence, a comprehensive hygienic assessment of office workplaces should include an efficient control of both these elements. indoor air quality office buildings bacterial and fungal aerosols size distribution 1.

INTRODUCTION. Indoor levels can vary from 10% of the outdoor air to levels as high as 80% of the outdoor air. The Food and Drug Administration has set a limit of ppm of ozone in indoor air. In recent years, there have been numerous advertisements for ion generators that destroy harmful indoor air pollutants.

after received by the laboratory. Fungal spores and hyphal fragments (together called propagules) that germinated and grew on the culture medium were identified and counted as CFU (=Colony Forming Units).

By factoring in the air volume sample, this sampling analysis generated quantitative data on viable and culturable fungi.

Fungal problems are normally associated with human health and indoor air quality. However, in archives, museums, and galleries, they assume another important role, especially for organic cultural heritage.

Paper-based heritage is prone to attack and destruction whenever optimal conditions (and fungus) are present. fungal spores downstream from a colony can be meaningfully high and can result in indoor air pollution (Hugenholtz and Fuerst, ). Aerosolization of fungal spores from moldy surfaces in indoor environments is driven mainly by aerodynamic forces (Wang.

et al., ; Fang. et al., ). The dominating force s include drag and lift forces. Indoor environments, where the average person in an industrial nation spends ≈90% of his or her life (), represent the most important interface between humans and es of well-known fungi include a few human pathogens (), allergens (), agents of structural rot (4, 5), and food spoilers (6, 7).Indoor fungi's prominent role in successful litigation around the world contributes to.

Clean air is a fundamental requirement for life. In the last two decades, there has now been a pronounced consciousness about the air quality of both the indoor and outdoor systems, as the. Atmospherl~ Em)ronment Vol 26A No 12 pp /92 $+ Printed in Great Britain,t Pergamon Press Ltd and Indoor Air 90 FUNGI AS CONTAMINANTS IN INDOOR AIR J DAVID MILLER Plant Research Centre, Agriculture Canada, Ottawa, Ontario Canada K1A 0C6 (Recewed for pubhcatton 26 Fehruarl, ) Abstract--This article rewews the subject of contamination of indoor air.

This report concerns the development of a method for the measurement of ergosterol in indoor air as a determinant of fungal exposure. Ergosterol was determined in spores of 11 species of Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Cladosporium selected from the most common molds in homes in Ontario.

Spore ergosterol content was about 1 ug/mg, which is the range reported for mycelia, and varied by about 25. Dulcilena de Matos Castro Silva, Raquel Keiko de Luca Ito, Lucas Xavier Bonfietti, Maria Walderez Szeszs, Artur Luiz Rocha, Natalia Viola, Edson Abdala, Marcia de Souza Carvalho Melhem, Antifungal and Antibacterial Activity of Terpenes for Improvement of Indoor Air Quality, Current Fungal Infection Reports, /s, ().

The indoor fungal concentrations were greater than outdoor concentrations for 32 (28%) rooms. When the indoor/outdoor (I/O) ratios were stratified by natural or mechanical ventilation, the naturally ventilated rooms were far more likely to have I/O > 1 (72%, P = ).

Propagules in Indoor Air," that suggests guidelines for fungi in air, sampling with a Reuter Centrifugal Sampler (Biotest AG, Dreieigh, Germany) with 2% malt extract agar Rose bengal mediumThe guidelines are based on a study19of. Fungal fragments as indoor air biocontaminants.

[Rafał L Górny, Tiina Reponen, Klaus Willeke, Detlef Schmechel, Enric Robine, Marjorie Boissier, Sergey A Grinshpun] PMID Abstract The aerosolization process of fungal propagules of three species (Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium melinii, and Cladosporium cladosporioides) was.

The release of fungal propagules varied depending on the fungal species, the air velocity above the contaminated surface, and the texture and vibration of the contaminated material. In contrast to spores, the release of fragments from smooth surfaces was not affected by air velocity, indicating a different release mechanism.Determination of Indoor Air Quality in Archives and Biodeterioration of the Documentary Heritage The development and maintenance of a fungal community on a shelf of a library and archive or in a single book or document depends on the spores that reach the surface of the material, on the microenvironment (temperature, relative humidity.The fungi most commonly recovered from both indoor and outdoor air were Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus, and the nonsporulating fungi.

For indoor samples, Cladosporium, Penicillium, the nonsporulating fungi, and Aspergillus were detected in 86, 80, 80, and 62% of .